Puppy Mills

Don’t necessarily believe a pet store if they tell you that their puppies don’t come from a puppy mill. Pet store employees are not always well trained to spot signs of abuse and mistreatment seen in puppy mills.

Often, pet store owners and managers and their staff don’t know the conditions that their pets are bred in. Sadly, the cold reality of many puppy mills is that dogs in puppy mills are often kept in small cages, fed as little as needed to keep them alive, denied adequate medical care, and receive little or no positive human attention.

The parents are seen as breeding machines to create as much profit as possible. Many female breeding dogs are euthanized as soon as they stop producing enough puppies. The puppies are seen as little products, and given only what is needed to get them shipped to a store where they can bring in money.

You’ve Decided on a Purebred

Congratulations! A purebred dog can be a wonderful companion and friend. Purebreds have highly predictable physical characteristics and behaviours, so you won’t need to spend a long time searching for perfect combination.

The first thing to do is to decide on a breed of purebred dog. Even if you have a good idea of the breed you’re interested in, taking a little time to do some research can help ensure that you’ve made the right choice.

Choosing the Right Breed of Dog

Choosing the right dog breed is pretty difficult. There are hundreds, maybe thousands of breeds. So, how do you even begin choosing dog breeds?

You probably have a general idea of the breeds that might work. Once you’ve got a good idea of the breeds you’re interested in, talk to several owners of the breeds you’d like to buy. This will help you greatly when choosing the right breed of dog.

Breeds vary enormously in personality, and it’s crucial to consider if a breed’s personality matches you and your family’s needs. Different breeds were developed for different functions, and this can greatly influence their behaviors, so choosing dog breeds is a pretty difficult task.

Small and Tiny Dog Breeds

How small is a small dog? Small dogs weigh about 12 to 30 pounds. Small dog types are a terrific choice for someone in a smaller house or apartment, or who would have trouble physically caring for a larger dog. Small dog types may shed less and give off less allergens than larger dogs (simply because they have less hair and a smaller body).

Small dog breeds tend to live, on average, about 14 years. Some small dog types live much longer, and some Terrier breeds can easily live to be 20 years old.

Small dog types tend to have some health issues, but these are usually related to specific breed characteristics, rather than their smaller size. Dachshunds, for example, tend to have spinal problems that result from breeding for their long bodies, and Pugs often have breathing problems that come from breeding for their unusually short noses.

Do you Want a Long-haired, Short-haired or Hairless Dog?

Thinking about a long-haired dog? There’s a lot of grooming. But, surprisingly, some short haired dog breeds can shed a lot as well!

For the most part, getting a long haired or short haired dog is simply a matter of personal experience. Some people just love the look of luxurious long fur on a dog, and other people see it only as a bother.

Long-haired dogs usually require more grooming time to keep their fur free from mats and looking good. So, if you get a long-haired dog breed, you may end up spending more time at the groomers, or brushing your long-haired dogs fur yourself. Just be aware that short-haired dog breeds don’t necessarily shed less than long-haired dogs.

How to Adopt a Dog

How to Adopt a Dog

One of the kindest, most responsible ways to get a dog is to adopt a dog that’s unwanted. Adopting a dog today is quite easy

Many people don’t want to adopt a dog from a rescue or animal shelter because they think of a used dog like a used car. After all, who wants someone else’s mistake and problem? Not true – when you adopt a dogs life improves immeasureably.

Truth is, most dogs at shelters are wonderful pets just waiting for someone to love them. They’ve ended up at the shelter because of their owners’ divorce or allergies, the owner becoming ill or unable to care for them or moving, a poor match with their owner (for example, a relaxed dog that only wants to hang out on the couch, matched with an owner who wants a running companion), or a hundred other reasons that are not the dog’s fault.

What about Getting a Senior Dog?

What about Getting a Senior Dog?

Many senior dogs end up for adoption each year through no fault of their own. The owner may have died, someone in the family developed allergies, or the family moved.

There are even cases where the family simply decided they couldn’t bear to see their dog get older and pass away. A large breed dog is considered senior at about seven years of age, and a small breed is considered senior at about twelve years of age.

A senior dog rescue can be an especially good choice for someone who wants a dog that is less active and energetic. Many senior dogs have mellowed a lot by the time they reach their senior years, and really want nothing more than a little food, short walks, and love and affection thrown in for good measure. A senior dog adoption can get you unconditional love and a friend for life.