Genetic Gastrointestinal Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Knowing the risk of developing a gastrointestinal disorder is relatively easy for a purebred dog. The risk of genetic gastrointestinal disorders is well understood for many breeds.

However, the risk of a gastrointestinal disorder for a mixed breed dog is hard to determine, since the exact breeds that make up a mixed breed dog aren’t often known.

However, mixed breed Dog DNA tests now provide a way to find out the breeds that make up a mixed breed. Once a dog’s parents or grandparents breeds are known, a vet can determine if a mixed breed may be at risk of a genetic gastrointestinal disorder.

Genetic Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

If your dog has a purebred ancestor, it may be susceptable to genetic disorders specific to purebreds. A mixed breed dog with a purebred ancestor can inherit a genetic disorder from its purebred parent or grandparent.

Unfortunately, owners of mixed breed dogs often have no idea if their dog is at risk of a genetic disorder. Until very recently, there was no way owners of mixed breeds could determine if their dog’s parents were purebreds (other than finding out directly who the parents were). Unfortunately, many dog owners have no information on the parents of their dog.

In the past couple of years, mixed breed Dog DNA tests have come on the market that can help you determine if your dog has a purebred parent or grandparent. Knowing your dog’s purebred ancestry can help you to determine if your dog is at risk of an inheritied genetic disorder.

Genetic Skeletal and Muscular Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Problems with the skeletal and muscular systems are among the most common disorders among purebred dogs.

However, owners of mixed breed dogs with a purebred ancestry often have no idea if their dog is at risk of developing disorder of the skeleton or muscle. This is because many mixed breed owners do not know if their dog has a purebred parent of grandparent.

Mixed breed Dog DNA tests, only available in the past few years, can tell if a mixed breed dog has parent or grandparent that was a purebred. Your vet can determine if your dog is at risk of inheritied genetic disorders once your vet knows the purebred ancestry of your mixed breed dog.

Genetic Eye Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Genetic Eye Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

nherited eye disorders are common in many purebreds. Some disorders can be predicted with genetic testing, but others can only be diagnosed with health testing, which will tell you if the dog has the disorder at a specific point in time.

Knowing if your dog is at risk for genetic eye disorders is relatively easy for purebreds, since some diseases are well known to exist within certain breeds. However, it’s much harder to determine if a mixed breed dog is at risk of a genetic eye disorder, since most owners don’t know the exact breeds that make up their mixed breed dog.

Genetic Endocrine, Immune and Respiratory Genetic Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Genetic Endocrine, Immune and Respiratory Genetic Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Today, vets know with a great deal of certainty if a purebred dog is at risk of developing a genetic disorder. However, determining the risk to a mixed breed is much more difficult. Most of the time, owners of mixed breed dogs don’t know with any certainty if their dog has purebred parents or grandparents.

Mixed breed Dog DNA tests have changed all that. These tests can tell owners and their vets if a mixed breed dog has a parent or grandparent that was a purebred. By knowing a dog’s purebred ancestry, a vet can then help determine if the dog is at risk of developing genetic disorders.

Genetic Skin, Urinary and Reproductive Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Genetic Skin, Urinary and Reproductive Disorders in Mixed Breed Dogs

Veterinarians today are armed with a great deal of knowledge about the genetic risks of disease for purebred dogs. Unfortunately, the risk of developing a genetic disorder for mixed breed dogs is much more difficult to determine. To know a dog’s risk of getting a genetic disorder, a vet must know the breeds of any of the dog’s purebred ancestors. In the past, this was almost impossible to determine.

Mixed breed Dog DNA tests now offer a relatively quick, at home method of determining if a mixed breed dog has a purebred parent of grandparent. Once this information is known, a vet can determine if a mixed breed is at risk of specific genetic disorders.